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Asperamanca
26.07.2006, 11:42
Hello,

I've created an ISO image of a (movie) DVD using Burnatonce (Raw reading from a Plextor CD/DVD drive), mounted it with Daemon tools and tried to play.
The trailer and menu displayed correctly, but once the real film started, everything became garbled. When playing from the original DVD, the film displayed just fine.

Any hints how I might find out what the problem is? Does Daemon tools support mounting for DVD playback? Is there a way to check whether the ISO image is corrupt?

Thanks for any help!

Copytrooper
26.07.2006, 12:17
Which software player do you use? What exactly do you mean "garbled" - e.g. playback stutter or artefacts?
Note that Daemon Tools does not support CSS protected images.

Asperamanca
26.07.2006, 19:38
I have tried both PowerDVD and VCLViewer, with the same result.
"Garbled" means the picture is completely unusable...as if someone put the film through the shredder. PowerDVD crashes as soon as I try to activate the context menu.

How do I recognize whether the image is CSS protected?

Underheaven
27.07.2006, 02:36
Raw reading from a Plextor CD/DVD drive How did you copy the DVD to your hard drive? I thought Burnatonce made images and didn't rip DVDs. I would google for some popular ripping program.

Asperamanca
27.07.2006, 14:25
Burnatonce does create an ISO images. Although it seems to be a burning program first and foremost, it does offer raw image reading.
I can mount it all right, and (as I noted) even the trailer and menu display correctly.

Copytrooper
27.07.2006, 17:36
Try to re-create the image with another software, e.g. Alcohol.

Asperamanca
30.07.2006, 09:10
While I'm trying it...does ANY of the "recommended programs" NOT install some kind of virtual drives, tray program, or meddle with my auto-instert notification setting? (Of course, without asking me first!)
Argh!


Try to re-create the image with another software, e.g. Alcohol.

Copytrooper
30.07.2006, 11:54
Well, you can try DVD Decrypter, but usage could be illegal in your country.

DomiOh
30.07.2006, 18:21
You can also try DVD43 - it decrypts DVDs on the fly... But that is maybe also illegal in your country.

Asperamanca
31.07.2006, 09:52
Same problems with an image created by CloneCD (newest version).

What does a copy protection have to do with it? If I really have a raw image, shouldn't it behave just the same way as the physical disc?

Underheaven
31.07.2006, 13:56
Everyone in this thread is wondering if you've removed the CSS protection or not. I don't know how to help you if you've not done it before- besides recommending the program Copytrooper mentioned.

DomiOh
31.07.2006, 15:08
What I wanted to mention: DVD43 is as good as AnyDVD, but it costs nothing. (It's free)

Asperamanca
31.07.2006, 15:17
Ok, seems we've run into a little communication problem...

I thought that an ISO image is basically a binary copy of a CD or DVD disk, at least when created using raw reading mode. So I expected it to show the same behaviour as the physical disk.

Therefore I didn't see your distinction between image creation and ripping at first.

No, I didnt care any bit about a copy protection. Based on the assumption above, a perfect raw copy should behave the same as the physical disc, so a copy protection (that doesn't install itself such as the infamous Sony BMG rootkit) should not recognize any difference.

Is there a basic distinction between how a physical disc and a mounted ISO image appears to a software accessing it?


Everyone in this thread is wondering if you've removed the CSS protection or not. I don't know how to help you if you've not done it before- besides recommending the program Copytrooper mentioned.

DomiOh
31.07.2006, 15:26
You cannot create a working image without removing the CSS protection, because the CSS Protection cannot be copied. Hope it's more clear, yet.

Jito463
31.07.2006, 21:03
CSS is not just a copy protection, it is an encryption scheme. This is why it must be removed and cannot just be copied.

Asperamanca
01.08.2006, 08:08
Thanks. That explains how the image would behave differently than the disc, though I am still wondering how the protection cannot be copied...itsn't it all bits and bytes to the drivers receiving the data in the end?


You cannot create a working image without removing the CSS protection, because the CSS Protection cannot be copied. Hope it's more clear, yet.

Underheaven
01.08.2006, 11:49
The point is you DON'T want your content protected. But you are TOTALLY focusing on understanding the wrong thing. 99.9% of users will have the protection removed automatically or will be denied a copy by their burning/image making software.

But you are having problems. It doesn't make sense so try a different copying software (the one Copytrooper recommended).

My next step after that would be to copy the images files onto another machine and try mounting and playing there. The step after that would be to compress the video and then burn to a DVD+-R

Asperamanca
01.08.2006, 17:09
Sorry, I have to admit my questions where no longer targeted at the problem...but curiosity got the better of me.


The point is you DON'T want your content protected. But you are TOTALLY focusing on understanding the wrong thing. 99.9% of users will have the protection removed automatically or will be denied a copy by their burning/image making software.

But you are having problems. It doesn't make sense so try a different copying software (the one Copytrooper recommended).

My next step after that would be to copy the images files onto another machine and try mounting and playing there. The step after that would be to compress the video and then burn to a DVD+-R

Underheaven
01.08.2006, 18:27
OK, so give the above stuff a try.

Historical perspective (if I remember correctly): When DVDs first came out there was no such thing as decss. You had to authenticate your drive by launching some DVD program and then quitting the program or minimizing it. Then you could copy all the visible files on the disc to a folder on your hard drive. This was in the days of FAT and small hard disks so fitting a whole disc at once was impressive. You could go online and get the decryption key for your disc and then use vobdec on the .VOB file or you could have a program called vobdec do a brute force method to decrypt the .VOB files. If you were to use windows explorer nowadays people will yell and scream at your for doing it wrong but: you'll get encrypted files unless you have dvd 4:3 or anydvd doing filtering in the background in which case the file copying will be decrypted without you even knowing about it or manually running a decryption program AFTER the copying is all done. If you also try to use explorer you'll fail miserably against bad sector dvd protection (yes this method or region code scripts or some other protection is common on most video dvds released today.).