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Thread: A good example of Microsoft greed

  1. #1

    Unglücklich A good example of Microsoft greed

    As the saying goes only in America

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2007/06...t_mvp_threats/

  2. #2

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    strange indeed. I did not read the full thing (letters etc.) but
    if Microsoft's license-agreement or whatever did not allowed
    such APIcalls and they have PROVE that this guy violated it:
    why did they not simply show him what he made wrong?

    So it looks really a bit weird.

    Nevertheless, if M$ doesnt want this, they CAN forbid it and this
    is a legitimate restriction. Would be only look better if their
    left hand knows what the right hand thinks about it at M$

  3. #3

    Default

    Well, i read pretty much all correspondence betweeb microsoft en the developer and microsoft kept avoiding the question about what rule actually gets broken. I think the microsofts case is pretty weak. They don't want the extension, but the current license doesn't forbid it in any way. Imo it seems they are just bullying to get what they want.

  4. #4

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    I only wonder why they allow the Visual Studio Express Editions to use this if they don't want it to be available for those editions?

  5. #5
    Experienced User
    Kinlaadare's Avatar
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    Default

    That's kinda ironic this tool was developed with the Express edition...
    Carpe diem

  6. #6
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    Elandril's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LocutusofBorg View Post
    Nevertheless, if M$ doesnt want this, they CAN forbid it and this
    is a legitimate restriction. Would be only look better if their
    left hand knows what the right hand thinks about it at M$
    It is a bit strange though, when you consider that MS integrated those APIs into Visual Studio Express, so that they can be used. I think that at most the person who uses this tool with VS Express breaks the EULA, but not the one who made the tool (with a full VS license bestowed by MS no less).

    The point is: I don't think you can forbid anyone to write a tool that uses publicly available information (API documentation) to interface with an API, which by itself doesn't do anything yet. You can only forbid the user of your API to let other programs interface with it, and I'm not even sure this can be employed in Europe, since EULAs have pretty much no stand against the laws here and are usually quite void.

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